250-692-7724 info@blcomfor.com

Omineca Cross-country Ski Club

OMINECA CROSS-COUNTRY SKI TRAILS & FOREST AWARENESS TRAIL

Maintained by the Omineca Ski Club

HOW TO GET THERE:

Head south on Highway 35 from Burns Lake, going approximately 5 km from town. A cross-country ski sign indicates the turn off to the trails. Turn left at the sign. Follow the gravel road to the ski lodge.

THE TRAILS:

  • Length: 25 km total – individual trails of varying length
  • Degree of Difficulty: easy-moderate
  • Condition: wide, groomed ski trails, grassed summer trails. Some flat, others gentle rolling and some with steep sections
  • Access Conditions: Paved to the Ski club access road which is gravel
  • Users: skiers, hikers, horseback riders, mountain bikers
  • Wildlife and Vegetation: Quite a variation in wildlife, from bears and moose to all types of birds. Vegetation includes pine stands with various plants.

The Omineca Ski Trails are well maintained and pass through various ecosystems, from mixed forests to open cut blocks. The trails include gentle or fairly flat trails to ones with steeper sections. The trails are rated according to difficulty and this is indicated on each trail and the trail sign in the parking lot.
There is also a 4 km Forest Awareness Trail and a 1.8 km Forest Management Trail that have designated stops on the trails. These stops point out different ecosystems and forest practices.
For more information consult the Forest Awareness Trails brochure

HISTORY:

The Omineca Ski Club was established in 1927, one of the first such clubs in British Columbia. The trails were developed on the ski club’s woodlot to further the ski program in the area and to benefit the community. The ski club is a world class facility. New trails have been added over the years, including a short Sprint Trail around the lodge and a longer 14 km touring trail (Aiden’s Trail). A biathalon range was added to the ski clubs amenities in 2009.

SAFETY:

Precautions should be taken with respect to bear encounters. Make adequate noise when walking as to alert any bears to your presence.

THE MAP:

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